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mark211Thoughts on Hugo award prize winners this century?2015-07-26 00:19:31
mark211(First of all, a very quick thanks to Pippin91, Richard, Michele and Ironspider for all your fascinating responses to last week's question on an imaginary space colony - the staged or phased colonisation seemed to be quite a theme. Well, that and Camden, New Jersey, eh Mr Tornello ; - ) ?)2015-07-26 00:21:49
mark211Voting on this year's Hugo Award nominees for science fiction closes on July 31st - just a few short days away now - which got me to wondering the prize winners from previous years and how many of them I know. 2015-07-26 00:25:46
mark211It turns out that since 2000, I've read seven novels of the fifteen winners (Gaiman, Mieville, R.R. Martin, Chabon, and Bacigalupi). You can see the full list of winners here on Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugo_Award_for_Best_Novel).2015-07-26 00:29:22
mark211So who have you read from Hugo winners since 2000? What were your favourite? Were there any that you thought were stand-out but also any that you left you baffled as to how anyone could have voted for such turgid dross? What do you feel about the awards generally? Do they truly reflect the nature of the SFF reading community or are they an attempt to popularise certain kinds of storyline over others? Be sure to let us know below ...2015-07-26 00:32:17
Pippin91I'll comment here on the post-2000 ones and then do another comment on the earlier (and better) ones. I've read Windup Girl, City and the City and American Gods and found all three disappointing for different reasons. Windup Girl was the best of the three but the premise was just too ridiculous for me - a world built on spring power??? The other two, as the rejection slips love to say, just "didn't grab me". I can't understand why there's nothing by Margaret Atwood here. The Oryx and Crake trilogy are the best three works of fiction I've read in the past decade. And how could Cryptonomicon lose out to A Deepness in the Sky? Don't get me wrong, I really liked "Deepness" but Cryptonomicon was superb!2015-07-26 12:25:44
Pippin91Prior to 2000 there are a few of my all-time faves on this list. Anyone who claims to be an SF fan and hasn't read "The Gods Themselves" and "A Canticle for Liebowitz" is denying himself/herself a real pleasure. Those books were the ones that got me interested in SF and I've rarely been as transported into new worlds like I was by them. Verner Vinge's "A Fire Upon the Deep" is another big favorite of mine, as is ANYTHING by Philip K Dick. It's surprising that his name isn't in the list more often. I just finished reading seveneves, Neil Stephenson's new doorstop novel (only 860 pages this time). That one might be worth a discussion topic of its own as there are a lot of interesting ideas in it. It will surely be a Hugo finalist next year.2015-07-26 12:35:55
Pippin91Prior to 2000 there are a few of my all-time faves on this list. Anyone who claims to be an SF fan and hasn't read "The Gods Themselves" and "A Canticle for Liebowitz" is denying himself/herself a real pleasure. Those books were the ones that got me interested in SF and I've rarely been as transported into new worlds like I was by them. Verner Vinge's "A Fire Upon the Deep" is another big favorite of mine, as is ANYTHING by Philip K Dick. It's surprising that his name isn't in the list more often. I just finished reading seveneves, Neil Stephenson's new doorstop novel (only 860 pages this time). That one might be worth a discussion topic of its own as there are a lot of interesting ideas in it. It will surely be a Hugo finalist next year.2015-07-26 13:33:50
mark211I have to confess I'm not familiar with either "The Gods Themselves" or "A Canticle for Liebowitz" but I guess will have to had those to my ever-expanding list ... Neal Stephenson would indeed be a good topic for discussion - perhaps next week (and do feel free to suggest a question through a DM on this site).2015-07-26 13:45:06
Pippin91Prior to 2000 there are a few of my all-time faves on this list. Anyone who claims to be an SF fan and hasn't read "The Gods Themselves" and "A Canticle for Liebowitz" is denying himself/herself a real pleasure. Those books were the ones that got me interested in SF and I've rarely been as transported into new worlds like I was by them. Verner Vinge's "A Fire Upon the Deep" is another big favorite of mine, as is ANYTHING by Philip K Dick. It's surprising that his name isn't in the list more often. I just finished reading seveneves, Neil Stephenson's new doorstop novel (only 860 pages this time). That one might be worth a discussion topic of its own as there are a lot of interesting ideas in it. It will surely be a Hugo finalist next year.2015-07-26 13:55:14





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