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Out of Nowhere by Patrick LeClerc.
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mark211Most complex female character?2015-08-30 02:44:07
mark211It is sometimes said, a little fairly in my opinion, that Science and Fantasy Fictions have a strong orientation toward a male audience and, as a consequence, the female characters in these works have tended to take something of a back seat when it comes to plot and character e.g. they are a princess to be rescued, a delicate flower that swoons at the sight of the (male) hero. While there is perhaps a grain of truth in this, especially when looking back to the pulp fiction press such as the early Amazing Stories and so on, I'm not sure this is so true any longer.2015-08-30 02:49:35
mark211From Game of Thrones alone, famously, there's Circe Lannister, Brienne of Tarth and Arya Stark to name but a few. Then there's also Elizabeth Moon's Paksenarrion, Margaret Atwood's handmaid, Offred, and of course we should really mention Katniss Everdeen of Hunger Games fame. So, who would you say are the most compelling female characters in SFF? They don't have to be the lead necessarily (e.g. Queen-in-waiting Kettricken from Robin Hobb's 'Assassin' series) but they should be a well-drawn complex character you find interesting. 2015-08-30 02:58:33
esullivan240Friday by Robert A. Heinlein2015-08-31 15:52:32
WessonI don't know. Excluding alternative media, I can't say I've been terribly impressed with the female characters I've seen recently. 2015-08-31 19:15:49
mark211For anyone else (like me) who was previously unaware of Heinlein's 'Friday', here's the Wikipedia link 2015-09-01 12:21:13
mark211There *was* the Wikipedia link! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friday_(novel)2015-09-01 12:21:32
WessonAt the risk of digressing, something here has made me think. The whole “knight rescuing the princess” angle tends to take a lot of flak, but is this really fair? I mean, when you get down to it, aren’t these stories teaching boys to treat girls with the respect they deserve? To look after them in their time of need – not because they can’t look after themselves – but because it’s the amicable thing to do? Perhaps we shouldn’t be so fast to dismiss these stories simply because the princess doesn’t perfectly represent what we think a female character should be. 2015-09-01 22:34:25
mark211@Wesson "The whole “knight rescuing the princess” angle tends to take a lot of flak, but is this really fair?" Well, you might be considered brave in some quarters for raising the question,but I think you have a reasonable point. The only thing, of course, and also as I'm sure you're more than aware, is the idea of why the Princess needs to be rescued at all. It's an intriguing question and one addressed at least as long ago as 1977 and this scene from Star Wars (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wtoHjGWc2s8) i.e. where Leia is *far* from uncritically grateful for the attempts made by her would-be rescuers. To go back to the original question though, my idea was more concerned with the depth or complexity of a character, not her toughness. Perhaps the examples weren't the best, but I was trying to ask for credible women characters in fiction, not necessarily the most kick-ass ones (Offred, from Atwood's A Handmaid's Tale is, I would say, a deep character without being a dominant one if that makes sense). Which is not to say that they cannot be both e.g. Paksennarion or Kettricken. 2015-09-02 14:42:15
Wesson@mark211 "To go back to the original question though, my idea was more concerned with the depth or complexity of a character ..." I agree, I apologize for going off topic there, ha, ha, it was just something I suddenly started thinking of. Complexity can a double edged sword at times, I think there's a fine line between a character who is complex and a character who is just melodramatic. 2015-09-02 17:01:20
SitrucHonor Harrington series written by David Weber2015-12-03 10:25:03





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