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mark211Getting published - your thoughts, feelings, experiences on this?2016-01-24 02:24:52
mark211After a brief PM exchange with QM's very own art director and staff writer, Richard Tornello, the subject of getting work that has been published here with Quantum Muse accepted by other publications, by publishing houses and so on. 2016-01-24 02:28:53
mark211So the basic questions for this week are: How important is it for you to get your work published in print? That is to say, to find your novel or collection of short stories on the bookshelves of Barnes & Noble, Kinokuniya or Waterstone's (and, indeed, Amazon as well now I hear) alongside those of Robin Hobbs, Greg Bear, John Kessel, George RR Martin etc. etc.? What are your feelings or experiences about this? What about self-publishing? Let us know. 2016-01-24 02:33:19
WessonI canít speak for everyone but itís not very important to me, I treat writing as a personal challenge to myself. Iím also lazy; submitting to SFF magazines requires too much effort and I usually run into editors who over-saturate their submission guidelines with things they want and things they donít want in a story. Itís something I derogatively refer to as ďThe Bitch ListĒ. Of course thatís not directed at Quantum Muse, your submission guidelines are nice and simple. All in all, Iím pretty much fine where I am. 2016-01-24 21:31:01
WessonI canít speak for everyone but itís not very important to me, I treat writing as a personal challenge to myself. Iím also lazy; submitting to SFF magazines requires too much effort and I usually run into editors who over-saturate their submission guidelines with things they want and things they donít want in a story. Itís something I derogatively refer to as ďThe Bitch ListĒ. Of course thatís not directed at Quantum Muse, your submission guidelines are nice and simple. All in all, Iím pretty much fine where I am. 2016-01-24 21:36:11
WessonWhy the heck did my comment post twice?2016-01-24 21:36:44
rtwesson: overlapping universes.

I'd like to make a few dollars every month by the sweat of my brain. It would be nice. But as I have mentioned to a few people, I would suppose if my writing is to be appreciated, it guess my grandchildren will be the ones toasting me and their trust funds.

other things I've seen, and heard would only make me seem like a grouchy old man so I will leave it at that. RT

2016-01-25 19:38:11
rtshould be: I guess my grandchildren, not it guess2016-01-25 19:39:33
IronspiderHaving anything I'd written published was never the point. When I was (very) young, I used to create stories by cutting pictures out of comics and writing different narratives around them. As I grew older I still looked at pictures but didn't incorporate them directly into my scribbling. I still do that now and I'm still writing for the same childish reason - I enjoy it. Before stumbling over QM I'd only ever had a couple of minor pieces published in a university writing group magazine. It's a good feeling when someone likes something you've written, but I don't write for praise (and I'd never be serious enough to do it for money) just for the joy of creating my own pocket realities and the people that inhabit them.2016-01-27 05:32:44
RTAre we really being truthful? Seriously, if we are artists, or wanna-be artists, and I consider writing an art, isn't our true goal and desire to make a living from what we love to do?

Possibly we Oldies (see Holo Grammy), well most of us realize that the dues paying times are long gone, and, if we're not in the game, then yes we do what we do for a variety of reasons. But the young ones, the ones with the fire in their bellies and passion in their hearts would be lying to us and themselves if they said they do it just for the heck of it and don't care.

I made that decision years ago for a variety of necessary reasons. And I knew that my decision locked me out of what I knew to be the hard road of the artist.

Do I regret it? Yes and no. Obligations and all that dictated to me what doors were to be shut. And I do remember thinking these thoughts in 1970 at the front of the doors of The Art Students League one afternoon following a day of classes.

I took a new very curving route to this place I am presently. So here i am. i write some I draw some and i make living doing what i do best, talk.

What I love: art music, poetry, literature, cooking, drinking and fucking.

2016-01-29 12:23:05
WessonYou make a compelling argument RT but odds are most of us will never make a living doing the things we love. Iím 27 years old so I guess Iím still one of the young ones but writing fiction for a living requires too many sacrifices for me. There is a collective of agents, publishers and self-proclaimed fiction elites out there and they all have demands they expect you to meet. And thatís not including the demands of audiences when you do become a mainstream writer. I think fiction is different than picture-art in this way: fiction for profit is much less subjective that art. Some people arenít bothered by all the studying and social networking required to get published (for money) but I do. Call me immature but I compromise for no one, I donít care if ten editors tell me my plot is silly or my characters are unbelievable, if I donít agree Iím not changing anything. I tend to think of The Fountainhead in situations like this. The main character is an architect who only designs buildings the way we wants them to be, money and social acceptance be damned. I donít scoff at writers who have worked hard to be published but there is plenty of euphoria just writing stories in a void. 2016-01-29 22:11:23
RTWesson, re picture-art, is even tougher. It's a billion dollar industry just for book covers. That billion is the company making most of the money, when they make money on a book.

All fields have the "stratified elite club". I studied with some way back when and saw what you are talking about first hand. I also witnessed more of what you mentioned at BALTICON. It was my 1st one of those.

Now regarding making changes, a good editor will see things that we writers sometimes miss. He/She will make recommendations and all that. It's up to the writer to make the changes. Robert Moriyama a former editor at Aphelion was incredible in that respect. He'd move a sentence around or just rephrase a paragraph, and voila!

The arts have always been a business. In the past it was having a rich patron. The artist writer had to eat. That was limiting in the scope and number of successful artists.

Today it's that elite patronage too and additionally the public is now a patron of sorts. With that come different demands and manipulations. The New York Review Of Books has an interesting article on the music business machine. One could extrapolate to the other arts I suppose.

I'm not sure what conclusion I can make from all this but I have seen the machine from the inside. And it is a machine. The creator, the food for the machine is just that. However, it still takes talent, to make the art, to bring it together, to connect with the Mind of the listener, viewer, reader.And great talent cannot be taught. Talent can be trained, and then that talent steps out and blossoms either as you prefer, and as most of us have to accept in order to live. And the few, like any highly skilled elite, get the gold ring and make their magic.

If it's real art, lucky them. If it's commercial manipulated schlock for the brainwashed, silly us for buying into it.

Sincerely, RT

2016-01-30 17:46:36
H Curtis DOther than being co-editor of my college poetry magazine in the 1970's I have never tried to be published. I will leave that to all my heirs. My kin want me to be published but so far they just read snippits of my poetry and my many stories. Writing is stress release, have no need for deadlines or publishing editors.2016-03-13 23:12:46





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